Review | Crooked Kingdom (Six of Crows #2) by Leigh Bardugo

Spoiler-free review: should you read this? Yes! 4/5 stars.

crooked-kingdom-by-leigh-bardugo

The blurb: I won’t put the blurb here to avoid spoilers for the first half of the story, Six of Crows. However, if you’re interested, you can see the blurb for that book and my review here.

My take:

This will be a short and slightly stunted, odd review as I attempt to avoid any and all spoilers. So, the short version: this is very good and if you enjoy fantasy fiction and haven’t read Six of Crows yet, get that book and then move on to this one! πŸ™‚

All the good things I said about book 1 of this duology also apply to Crooked Kingdom, so I’ll try not to repeat myself here by going on about great use of multiple viewpoint, skillful plotting and brilliant character development. That said, I didn’t enjoy Crooked Kingdom quite as much as Six of Crows. It didn’t have the same sparkle or nail-biting quality. Also, I did start to wonder whether the series of double, triple and quadruple crossings were maybe drawing things out a little too much. However, this is all more than compensated for by wonderful interactions between the main characters and the descriptions of Ketterdam.

This time, all the action takes place within the city limits, giving Bardugo more time to describe all the nooks and crannies of Ketterdam, bringing it out as a character in its own right. I honestly believe I could tell you what different parts of the place smell like, that’s how good her descriptions are.

And this book is much funnier than the first. As the characters become ever more comfortable with each other, their conversations sometimes slip into sibling-like squabbling and are very amusing. I laughed out loud more than once at Jesper’s comments, particularly his digs at Wylan.

If you do plan on reading the Grisha trilogy as well as the Six of Crows duology, I’d suggest reading the Grisha first. In my review of Six of Crows, I said you didn’t really need to have read the Grisha first, but Crooked Kingdom does contain some spoilers for the trilogy. However, for those of us who’ve already read the Grisha, it was great to see some of the most interesting characters from that series pop up here.

I didn’t feel the ending was entirely satisfying. But then I think this is because most of the characters are only 17 and Bardugo has plans for them in the future. She can’t wrap everything up in a neat bow if she has to leave some threads hanging for future development. And I, for one, would be delighted to see any of the main characters againΒ  πŸ™‚

Overall: more brilliant plotting and great character development make for another wonderful book. I hope we get to see more from the characters in the future.


Claire Huston / Art and Soul
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16 thoughts on “Review | Crooked Kingdom (Six of Crows #2) by Leigh Bardugo

  1. I own both novels in this series so far and have only read review that rave about Bradugo’s writing like yours… I just need to have a decent chunk of time to dedicate to reading them! Thanks for sharing your review – it’s like peer pressure saying ‘go on, just read one page, you’ll like it’ and then like an addict I’ll be hooked in and never put the book down. Oh the agony! Ha ha Happy reading πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • Haha! There are worse things to get hooked on πŸ™‚
      It took me a while to get into the first book because there are so many characters to introduce. But it’s well worth the effort because once they’ve hooked you, they’re fantastic!
      I understand what you mean about the time – they’re both rather chunky books!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you!
      It’s very good. A bit long maybe… but then it’s like when you see a film and come out of the cinema saying, “It should have been 20 minutes shorter” and someone says, “Which 20 minutes would you have cut?” and you say, “I don’t know!!” So probably all essential πŸ™‚

      Liked by 2 people

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